NIV Thinline Bible Bonder Leather, Indexed

9780310448778_2-1513180950The NIV Thinline Bible has done something that most Bibles its size do not do: have readability in a small package. Some of the thinner Bibles I have either sacrifice the typeface size for a smaller Bible or have a taller size with a thinner depth with a larger print.

This Bible has a 9.4 font size with depth of less than one inch which make this an ideal carry Bible for those looking for such a Bible. The binding is solid and the pages are of quality material. There are a few footnotes that help the reader but as a whole, this Bible is designed to be read and not be interrupted with study aids and cross-references.

*I received a complimentary copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for my honest review.

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Exalting Jesus in John by Matt Carter & Dr. Josh Wredberg

JohnMost commentaries explore the text to understand its meaning and to aid the reader in better study of the text. A commentary may point out unique phrases or reference a verse of verses inside of the context of the chapter and/or book. This can be a very helpful resource in understanding Scripture.

The Christ-Centered Exposition commentaries are different. Each volume has the intent of seeing Christ honored with each passage exposited. In Exalting Jesus in John, the authors  seek to see Christ honored as they comment on the workings and life of Jesus as seen through the eyes of John.

I really appreciated how the authors broke the Book of John in sections and highlighted key teachings and applications for the reader. Then they ask a series of questions for the reading to take the principles learned and apply them. In this way, this series serves as a commentary and a Bible study in one.

I recommned this series for its unique perspective on Bible commenting and suggest that it also be used for small group study.

*I received a complimentary copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for my honest review.

Evidence That Demands a Verdict by Josh McDowell & Sean McDowell, PhD

225_350_book-2411-coverThe Christian faith has been under attack since the very start of it. By either trying to deny the resurrection of Christ or to claim that Christ never said He was God, antagonists have tried their best to discredit and malign Christianity. Some have managed to turn followers of Christianity away from their faith believing that no evidence exists to support their beliefs.

Josh McDowell and his son Dr. Sean McDowell have updated the classic work Evidence that Demands a Verdict. This work is designed to arm Christians with information to support their faith and answer critics. Ranging in topics like: evidence for the Bible being true, supposed contradictions in the Bible, evidence for the resurrection of Christ, and evidence for truth. By addressing this issues, the McDowells have given Christians ammunition to attack the lies that try to threaten their spiritual foundation.

One area that was of particular interest to me was the appendix relating to issues posed by Dr. Bart Ehrman. Dr. Ehrman has written several books attacking Christianity by attacking the Bible but not in a methods from previous attacks.Rather, Dr. Ehrman focuses on the variants in the manuscripts and tries to use this to show that we cannot be sure of words in the New Testament. The McDowells address this and other arguments presented by Dr. Ehrman and give some excellent information on why Dr. Ehrman’s information is faulty.

This book should be in every Christian’s library as more attacks are being made against Christianity and Christians need to be able to defend their beliefs.

*I received a complimentary copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for my honest review.

The Whole Bible Story by Dr. William H. Marty

9780801098642When it comes to reading the Bible sometimes there can be a disconnect when reading a particular book. When focusing on the material in one book we forget that the Bible has an overarching story throughout the entire Pages.

Dr. William H Marty has put together a book so that the individual reading the Bible understands the global story that the Bible is trying to portray outside of the local stories that are happening. What I mean by local stories in my example is what is happening at a certain time and place.

By showing the narrative as a continual story rather than a bunch of stories woven together dr. Marty allows for the reader of the Bible to see how God is working his plan throughout human history to accomplish as well and show his glory.

This book has great insights and helpful images to show exactly what is happening as a reader goes through the pages and the corresponding verses in the Bible. One aspect I was really happy with is that this  particular book does not try to teach a particular Doctrine or Viewpoint. Rather it is simply giving the reader the  the higher story within the smaller stories that the Bible is telling.

I received a complimentary copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for my honest review.

A Textual Commentary on the Greek New Testament (UBS4): 2nd Revised Edition by Bruce Metzger

9781598561647oIn the past few months I have been fascinated by the study of textual criticism. To see how men are actively reviewing the manuscripts of the Bible to determine what was originally written has opened up to me a new appreciation for the Word of God. It has also shown me why there are some differences in various translations of the English Bible.

In his book, A Textual Commentary on the Greek New Testament (UBS4): 2nd Revised Edition, Dr. Bruce Metzger gives detail into verses of the New Testament and why the committee of the Greek New Testament (United Bible Society, 4th edition) chose the readings that they did. Dr. Metzger gives historical background on certain manuscripts and also the methodology of the translators to show how they arrived at the conclusions they did.

In some cases the choice was easy. A verse or verses did not follow the flow of the writer so it was apparent that someone changed the text. In other cases, many manuscripts agreed with each other and only a few dissented. However, there are some where the decision was not so easy and the reasoning was given by Dr. Metzger on why the reading was chosen over another reading.

As an example, there is a famous passage of Scripture, the woman caught in adultery, that is not in some of the best manuscripts. Also, some have it in a different gospel. Dr. Metzger goes into the history of this passage citing church fathers, current research, and textual evidences to show the reader that this passage may not be authentic. Thus, when the reader sees in a modern translation notes about this story not being in the original, Dr. Metzger’s book gives reasons why it is treated as such.

I also appreciate the introduction which gave history into the field of textual criticism. Dr. Metzger points out that certain documents seem to originate from a common source and there are several common sources for many of the manuscripts discovered to this date. These common sources share characteristics which let the translator know how a passage was written.

Some of the characteristics are: paraphrasing over verbatim copying, explanation of the texts versus leaving the words as is, changing of words for better flow of grammatical structuring, and questioning certain words or phrases altogether.

This book has really opened my eyes into Bible translation and the painstaking way in which the translators are carefully regarding each word they hold to be authentic.

*I received a complimentary copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for my honest review.

Exalting Jesus in Acts by Tony Merida

ActsWhen going through any book of the Bible one must take note to recognize what the author is trying to convey. Each author has a specific way in which they present Jesus Christ as the Redeemer and Savior of mankind. Therefore, the reader must take note as they are reading Bible passages to see how Christ is being presented or hinted at in various passages.

In his book, Exalting Jesus in Acts, Tony Merida has written a commentary on how Jesus Christ is exalted throughout the books of Acts. Merida shows how Christ is exalted in Acts and does so in a expository and devotional way.

For example, the section on the first seven verses of Acts has: the main idea of these seven verses, bullet points on the various topics within those verses, as well as its commentary on these verses. In addition, at the end of this section are reflection and discussion questions. These are very helpful for someone who is leading a Bible study or perhaps a pastor who is preparing a sermon.

I was rather surprised by this because most of the commentaries that I have strictly try to take from scripture what the verses are trying to communicate. There is not much in the way of devotional thought. By adding this element, I enjoyed reading the commentaries and using the questions to see my risen Savior in the passage.

With this guide in mind I can see this particular series being very helpful to those who want to do Bible study with a devotional aspect but not a pure devotional study or a pure exegetical study. Rather it is almost a hybrid between the two and I really enjoy that type of approach.

*I received a complimentary copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for my honest review.